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Ginger Miso Fermented Scallions

 

Fermented scallions are a versatile addition to your summer recipes. They’ll add a bit of onion flavor, along with a bit of the freshness that comes from incorporating the scallion greens into the mix. This recipe, in particular, is for ginger miso fermented scallions, which goes well with Asian dishes. Try a homemade ramen bowl, quick-and-easy scallion pancakes, or try using them in egg rolls or dumplings.

 

Posted by Ashley

 

 

This recipe for Ginger Miso Fermented Scallions is a two for one deal. The brine itself is a flavorful mix of ginger, miso paste and soy sauce, infused with the freshness of scallions. While the scallions are being infused with flavor in this ferment, they’re also imparting their flavor into the brine which can be used as a dipping sauce or as a probiotic replacement to soy sauce in recipes.

Potstickers, whether homemade and frozen in advance or store bought, whip up quickly for a satisfying weeknight meal and a traditional dipping sauce is made using soy sauce, ginger, garlic, and scallions. It’s easy enough to substitute the fermentation liquid from this recipe to incorporate fresh probiotics into your meal. Similarly, this brine makes a great dipping sauce for sushi, egg rolls, or just about anything you’d normally choose to dip into soy sauce.

 

How to Make Ginger Miso Fermented Scallions | Fermentools.com

 

Some of the salt in this recipe comes from the miso and soy sauce, so if you choose to alter the recipe and make plain fermented scallions without the miso and soy sauce, or to use less miso and soy sauce, be sure to adjust accordingly.

 

How to Make Ginger Miso Fermented Scallions

 

A Ginger Miso Fermented Scallion Recipe

Yield: 1 Pint
Fermentation time: 5 Days
Tools: Pint wide mouth Mason jar and Fermentools kit

Ingredients:

• 1.75 cups scallions (diced, or cut just long enough to stand in the jar, your choice)
• 2-3 cloves garlic
• 1 inch section of ginger, grated or finely sliced
• 1 Tb miso paste
• 2 Tb soy sauce
• 1 tsp Salt
• 1 cup water

 

How to Make Ginger Miso Fermented Scallions | Fermentools.com

Directions:

  1. Remove the roots of the scallions, and chop off and discard the very tops of the scallion greens if wilted and not firm. Chop the scallions into either thinly sliced rounds, or leave them long for finger length scallion pickles to later slice lengthwise to incorporate as scallion matchsticks into a stir fry.
  2. Chop the scallions into either thinly sliced rounds, or leave them long for finger length scallion pickles to later slice lengthwise to incorporate as scallion matchsticks into a stir fry.
  3. Either grate the ginger for more ginger flavor, or finely slice it, and you’ll be able to eat the pickled ginger pieces and incorporate them into recipes along with the scallions.
  4. Peel the garlic, and again, press or grate the garlic for a stronger flavor, or slice the garlic to use the garlic pieces as fermented garlic in recipes once the ferment is completed.
  5. Pack the scallions, ginger, and garlic into a pint wide mouth Mason jar.
  6. Whisk together water, salt, soy sauce, and miso paste to form your fermentation brine.
  7. Pour the fermentation brine over the vegetables and attach a Fermentools fermentation airlock and lid.
  8. Ferment at room temperature for 5 days.

After 5 days, taste your ferment and either continue for another day or two or remove the fermentation lid and refrigerate. Be sure to incorporate the flavorful fermentation liquid into sauces or use it as a dip.

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When you have a variety of several different foods to ferment, you want to have more fermentation lids for Mason jars on hand. Fermentools lids are made to last a lifetime, of surgical steel. Get a 12-pack in our store!

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Ashley Hetrick of Vermont Mango Plantation | FermentoolsAshley is an off grid homesteader in central Vermont. She is passionate about fermentation, charcuterie, and foraging. Read more about her adventures at PracticalSelfReliance.com.

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