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Fruit

  • Fermented Cranberries

     

    Bring a new flare to the typical cranberry recipes by creating the simple and delicious Fermented Cranberries!

    Ingredients:

    (1) A Package of  fresh Cranberries

    (2) 2 Tablespoons of chopped Ginger Root

    (3) 1 Orange or Lemon (zest and juice)

    (4) 1 Cinnamon Stick or 1tsp Ground Cinnamon

    (5) 4Tablespoons of Granulated Sugar

    (6) 1/2 Tablespoon of Fermentool's Himalayan Salt

    (7) Fermentools Stainless Steel Mason Jar Lid and Airlock System

    How to Make Fermented Cranberries

    (1) Mash or Chop your cranberries by hand or in a blender or food processor to release their delicious juices.

    (2) In a large bowl add your chopped ginger root, orange (or lemon) zest and jucie, sugar, and salt and mix well.

    (3) Place a Cinnamon stick (or desired amount of ground cinnamon - suggested 1tsp) to bottom of mason jar. Add Cranberry mixture to the jar. Leave 1 inch of head space.

    (4) Fill the jar with filtered water until the liquid rises about an inch over your cranberry mixture. Then apply your Fermentools Lid and Airlock System and let sit on the counter or other warm location for 3-10 days depending on the temperature of your kitchen and the desired taste of your cranberries.

    • Variations: Ferments are a great place to express your individual tastes and flavors! Feeling like adding some apple juice, cloves, or walnuts? Go for it! Make this basic recipe your own masterpiece! At Fermentools.com, we provide The Tools You Need to Ferment With Success!

    How To Use Fermented Cranberries

    • Mix with cream cheese and a sweet and tangy spread for crackers, toast, cookies, or cheese cake
    • Eat as a side dish or garnish for meat dishes such as turkey, chicken or fish
    • Mix into oatmeal or with yogurt and granola
    • Blend into beverages (such as kefir or carbonated water) to add probiotics and a cranberry twist
    • Top Pancakes or Muffins with butter and this cranberry garnish
    • Take straight up as a daily supplement

    Let us know in the comments below if you made this and how you used it!!

    . . .
  • How to Make a Ginger Bug

    There is nothing as tempting as a carbonated soda! When you pop open the top of the bottle or can, the sound of fizzing, the sight of carbon dioxide escaping in vapor form, the feel of bubbles on your tongue... there is just nothing like it. Soda has a reputation of being bad for your health; but does it have to be? Fermenting beverages add a tasty energizing and probiotic treat that both kids and adults can enjoy guilt free!

    Let's talk about how to create a Ginger Bug today!

    What is a Ginger Bug?

    It's really simple and extremely easy to make!

    A Ginger Bug is a mixture of shredded ginger root, sugar, and water that has cultivated wild yeast and bacteria cultures where fermenting occurs resulting in carbon dioxide yumminess! One difference between a Ginger Bug and kombucha or kiefer is that a ginger bug does not require a special culture, scoby or grain to start!

    Starting a Ginger Bug is similar to starting a sourdough culture.

    How to Start a Ginger Bug!

    All you need is:

    ~ A Mason Jar

    ~ Ginger Root

    ~ Sugar

    ~ Water

    ~ Fermentools Airlock System

    Step by Step:

    Step One: Grate 2-3 TBSP of ginger root.

    Step Two: Place ginger root, and 2-3 TBSP of sugar into a mason jar and cover with water. Mix until sugar dissolves.

    Step Three: Place Fermentools Airlock System on top of the jar to ensure that carbon dioxide can escape and bad bacteria or house pests (or pets) don't get into your culture. Place your ferment in a warm place in your kitchen so it can commence on it's fermenting endeavors!

    Step Four: Every 24 hours, drain off a few tablespoon of liquid right off the top of your soon to be Ginger Bug. Add 2TBSP of ginger and 2TBSP of sugar. Repeat this for 3-5 days until plenty of bubbles have formed.

    * It may take more then 5 days of fermenting for a good bubbly culture to form depending on the temperature of your kitchen.

    Warmer kitchen = faster ferment, more alcohol taste.

    Cooler Kitchen = slower ferment, more acidic taste.

    YOU'RE DONE!!!!

    What do you do with your new Ginger Bug??

    Look out for next week's post on making a basic Ginger Brew Soda Pop!

    . . .
  • Homemade Water Kefir Gummies

    My kids love gummie bears. But I don't love the artificial food coloring and other additives in them. This recipe for water kefir gummies will certainly replace the typical gummie bear in my kids' diets.
    . . .
  • Easy, Homemade Apple Cider Vinegar

    If you live anywhere near apple country, or have access to a supply of apples, making your own apple cider vinegar is a treat. Best part of the process is that you can create ACV from the waste after making pie or apple butter or other apple goodies.
    . . .
  • Delicious Lacto-Fermented Pumpkin

    Lacto-fermented pumpkin is a great way to celebrate fall, and yields a firm but delicious addition to any meal. For this recipe, we used a sugar pumpkin, which is known as the best baking pumpkin out there. You can also substitute any winter squash or gourd in this great recipe.
    . . .
  • How to Make Fermented Grape Leaves

    The great thing about fermenting foods is that it opens you up to a wide array of foods that you probably wouldn't try otherwise. In this post, Sarah makes something that sounds much unlike food to me, sound appetizing. Read on and see what you think.
    . . .
  • What is Kahm Yeast & Is it safe?

    As a newbie fermenter, I came across kahm yeast and promptly threw everything out. I wish I knew then what I know now. If you are wondering if your ferment is safe, read on as Colleen explains what kahm yeast is and what it mean
    . . .
  • How to Make Flavored Kombucha

    If there is one thing I want folks to know about fermenting food, it's that fermenting food is about more than sauerkraut. Don't get me wrong. Sauerkraut is great. But when I think of all the other possibilities, I just get goosebumps. Especially when that fermented something is kombucha. So read on for some variations of this delicious, healthy drink.
    . . .
  • What Foods Can I Ferment?

    I have learned much about fermenting foods since I started a few years ago. In fact, there are foods, you probably eat regularly, that I didn't even know were fermented—like chocolate! Who knew? Read this post for a great discussion on what types of foods you can ferment safely.
    . . .
  • Fermented Strawberry Preserves

    One summer, as my family emptied jam jars as fast as I filled them, (and I used pints, mind you) I wondered, can I put jam in quarts? I never found out because then my kids started growing up and moving out and I didn't have the need. I also never knew you could ferment jam! I'm seriously trying this recipe, but I'm not considering quarts, anymore.
    . . .

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The information on this website is not intended to replace professional medical diagnosis, treatment or advice. Health claims on this website do not warranty, guarantee, or predict the outcome for others. Fermentools strongly recommends readers consult a trusted healthcare professional for any medical condition. All information and links to other resources are posted in good faith. We cannot guarantee the accuracy or validity of any information shared from other publications. Fermentools accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever for the use or misuse of the information contained on this website.